Winfred Rembert: 1945-2021 at Fort Gansevoort in October, 2021

 

 

 

Winfred Rembert, All Me, 2002; Dye on carved and tooled leather; 25 x 25 inches.; © 2021 Winfred Rembert / ARS NY; Courtesy Estate of Winfred Rembert and Fort Gansevoort

Fort Gansevoort will open its doors to Winfred Rembert: 1945-2021, a solo exhibition of works by Winfred Rembert, opening Thursday, October 7th (6-8 PM) at the gallery’s New York City space in the historic Meatpacking District.

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Randolph Lamonier: My Kind of Dirty, an Online Exhibition in conversation with Maxwell Alexandre + Raphael Fonseca at Fort Gansevoort Gallery on View in April

 

 

 

Randolpho Lamonier, Rua Vista Alegre (Vista Alegre Street), 2021 Mixed media (fabric, embroidery and buttons on carpet) 17.5 x 24 in., RL005

Beginning Thursday, April 1st, Fort Gansevoort will present My Kind Of Dirty, the gallery’s first exhibition with Brazilian artist Randolpho Lamonier. This online presentation brings together recent textile works in which Lamonier responds to his upbringing in Contagem, an industrial city in southeastern Brazil, drawing upon observations of hardship and inequality to create powerful expressions in vivid colors, word combinations, and raw images. The artist locates his inspiration in an environment where joy grows proportionally to misfortune and likens his work to diaristic entries. Rendered in deceptively humble handwork and fabrics, the scintillating psychedelic landscapes on view in My Kind Of Dirty celebrate “the exuberance of life that resists against the necropolitical agenda guided by the current Brazilian government,” the artist has said. In this way, Lamonier’s approach to representation acts as personal revolution, whereby the aura of possibility defines his blueprint for the future. My Kind Of Dirty is accompanied by the transcript of a conversation between Lamonier and fellow Brazilian artist Maxwell Alexandre with curator Raphael Fonseca.

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Sacred Nation, Scared Nation ~ a Virtual Exhibition to Open at Fort Gansevoort

 

 

 

Above Image: Gordon Hookey, Ready to Rumble, 2020, Oil pastel and pencil on paper, 30.5 x 44 inches.

Beginning January 7, Fort Gansevoort will present Sacred Nation, Scared Nation, the gallery’s first exhibition with the noted Waanyi Aboriginal artist Gordon Hookey. Organized in collaboration with Los Angeles-based artist Gary Simmons, the presentation will focus on Hookey’s use of metaphors, wordplay, and humor – sometimes brazenly provocative – to subvert tropes of Western colonialization and to reclaim, empower, and redefine Aboriginal culture. Eschewing the traditional dot abstraction most commonly associated with indigenous Australian art, he deploys deceptively folksy figuration, contemporary images, and bold painted words in paintings that connect Black Aboriginal experience to that of African Americans.

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‘Michaelangelo Lovelace. Nightshift’ coming to the Online Viewing Room at Fort Gansevoort

 

 

Michaelangelo Lovelace, Untitled, 2008. Ink one paper. 8.5 x 11 in. ML209.. Image courtesy Fort Gansevoort Gallery

Beginning Thursday, May 28, Fort Gansevoort will present Nightshift, an exhibition of drawings by Michelangelo Lovelace (b. 1960), composed from the bedsides and common areas of nursing homes throughout Cleveland, Ohio, where he has worked for over 30 years as a nurse’s aide while pursuing his artistic practice.

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Fort Gansevoort Gallery debuts ‘Seeing Through You’, a Series of Weekly Online Exhibitions

 

 

Pilar Trujillo, Desayuno sobre la hierba, 2015. Tapestry (burlap embroidery with wool), 73 x 61 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Fort Gansevoort

Fort Gansevoort Gallery will open its online window, announcing SEEING THROUGH YOU, a series of weekly online exhibitions organized for the gallery by invited curators and scholars. Launching with its first exhibition on Thursday, March 26, 2020, this initiative will highlight artists from around the globe and aim to initiate lively discourse among larger and more diverse audiences for whom the web and social media are an even more vital ‘salon space’ in a time of crisis.

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Gordon Hookey: Sacred Nation, Scared Nation at Fort Gansevoort

 

 

 

Gordon Hookey, GH001, Pelvis Deadly, 2005, Oil on canvas, 48 x 66.25 inches

Fort Gansevoort Gallery will open its doors to Sacred Nation, Scared Nation, the first solo exhibition in the United States for noted Brisbane-based Waanyi Aboriginal artist Gordon Hookey (b. 1961, Cloncurry, Australia). Hookey uses metaphors, wordplay, and humor – sometimes brazenly provocative – to subvert tropes of English colonialization and to reclaim, empower, and redefine Aboriginal culture. Eschewing the traditional dot abstraction most commonly associated with indigenous Australian art, Hookey deploys deceptively folksy figuration and bold painted words in paintings that connect Black Aboriginal experience to that of African Americans.

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Vanessa German: Trampoline at Fort Gansevoort

 

 

 

Vanessa German, Venus as an Around Away Girl, 2019, Mixed-media collage on New York Times magazine, 25 x 19.5 x 5 inches

Fort Gansevoort, in association with Pavel Zoubok Fine Art, is pleased to present Vanessa German, TRAMPOLINE: Resilience & Black Body & Soul, opening Thursday, November 7th, 2019. German’s exhibition will showcase her richly encrusted sculptures, which she refers to as power-figures, alongside a series of wall-mounted altars that each act as seers or protectors carrying with them the gift of their own human technology: joy, love, and protection for the souls of Black Americans. The work is made as an act of love in response to the daily injustices and violence committed against Black and Brown people, their bodies and their souls. Each figure confronts us with the questions, “how do we survive? How do we, as hybrid-people, keep breathing? How then do we surpass mere existence into creative champions, future makers, lovers even?”

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