Salon 94 Unveils the Exhibition ‘Desert + Coast: Seven Elder Aboriginal Painters’

 

 

 

Installation view, Desert + Coast: Seven Elder Aboriginal Painters, 2024. The Wood Room, Nongirrna Marawili. Courtesy of the artist and Salon 94. Photo: Elisabeth Bernstein

Spanning Salon 94’s landmark 3 East 89th Street building, Desert + Coast: Seven Elder Aboriginal Painters presents works by seven renowned senior women artists from Australia. From the deserts, Pitjantjatjara women Betty Muffler and Maringka Burton work from—and heal—the arid, sun-scorched Aṉangu Pitjantjatjara Yankuntjatjarra (APY) Lands, while Pintupi artists Mantua Nangala and Yukultji Napangati paint stories belonging to women in the remote communities where they live and work. By contrast, the rich traditions and coastal landscapes of northern Arnhem Land are reflected in the colorful, expressive paintings of Yolŋu artists Dhambit Munuŋgurr and Noŋgirrŋa Marawili on eucalyptus bark and board, while Kaiadilt artist Mirdidingkingathi Juwarnda Sally Gabori feverishly painted her relationship to her traditional home of Bentinck Island in an unprecedented outburst of creative energy and aesthetic reconfiguration.

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‘Natalie Ball: bilwi naats Ga’niipci’ On View at Whitney Museum of American Art

 

 

 

Image credit: Natalie Ball, Burden Basket, 2023. Elk rawhide, cotton, newspaper, wood, leather, plastic beads, willow branches, artificial hair, aluminum foil, chalk, metal clamps, rope, makeup, and graphite, 80 × 60 × 24in. (203.2 × 152.4 × 61 cm). Collection of the artist. Photo by Audrey Wang

Natalie Ball: bilwi naats Ga’niipciopening at the Whitney Museum of American Art today, November 17, 2023, is the first New York solo exhibition for boundary-breaking artist and community leader Natalie Ball.

The exhibition presents a group of never-before-seen sculptural assemblages that deepen and destabilize understandings of Indigenous life in the United States. Ball, who is Black, Modoc, and Klamath, lives and works in her ancestral homelands in Southern Oregon and Northern California, where, in addition to creating artworks, she serves as an elected official on the Klamath Tribes Tribal Council.

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Sixteen Artists Consider the Economic Dimensions of Indigenous Sovereignty in ‘The House Edge’ at The 8th Floor in September

 

 

 

Jim Denomie, The Posse, 1995. Oil on canvas, 36×48 in. Courtesy of the artist’s estate and Bockley Gallery.

The Shelley & Donald Rubin Foundation is pleased to present The House Edge, curated by Caitlin Chaisson. The exhibition features the work of sixteen artists who consider the economic dimensions of Indigenous sovereignty. Though capitalism seeks to define relations between subjects and places, the artists demonstrate how notions of land ownership, property, and consumerism are contested and rewritten through diverse Indigenous practices. Showcasing drawing, painting, print, sculpture, video, and photography, with many works exhibited publicly for the first time, The House Edge will take place at The 8th Floor and run from September 28, 2023 through January 13, 2024. Featured artists include David Bradley, Jim Denomie, Joe Feddersen, Harry Fonseca, G. Peter Jemison, Chaz John, Matthew Kirk, Terran Last Gun, Rachel Martin, Kimowan Metchewais, Nora Naranjo-Morse, Jaune Quick-to-See Smith, Duane Slick, Bently Spang, Hulleah J. Tsinhnahjinnie, and Nico Williams.

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Public Art Fund presents ‘Nicholas Galanin: In every language there is’ to unveil at Brooklyn Bridge Park in May, 2023

 

 

 

IMAGE CREDITS: Nicholas Galanin. In every language there is Land / En cada lengua hay una Tierra, 2023. Corten steel. Courtesy of the artist and Peter Blum Gallery. Photo: Nicholas Knight, courtesy Public Art Fund, NY. Presented by Public Art Fund at Brooklyn Bridge Park, New York City, May 16 through Fall 2023.

On May 16, 2023, Public Art Fund will debut In every language there is Land / En cada lengua hay una Tierra, a monumental corten steel sculpture by artist Nicholas Galanin. The artist’s first public artwork in New York City, this new 30-foot tall sculpture combines references to the US/Mexico border wall and Pop Art, serving as a point of focus to consider the legacy of colonization and its impact on migration and our relationships with Land across generations, cultures, and communities. In every language there is Land / En cada lengua hay una Tierra questions the concept of border walls, which are designed to cut across land and water, restricting access to the migratory routes necessary for various life forms.

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‘Jaune Quick-to-See Smith: Memory Map’ will Open at The Whitney Museum of American Art in April

 

 

 

Image credit: Jaune Quick-to-See Smith, Indian Map, 1992. Oil, paper, newspaper, and fabric on canvas, two panels: 60 × 100 in. (152.4 × 254 cm) overall. Private collection. © Jaune Quick-to-See Smith. Photograph by David Bowers

Jaune Quick-to-See Smith: Memory Map,on view at the Whitney Museum of American Art from April 19 through August 13, 2023, is a recognition of a groundbreaking artist’s work. For nearly five decades, Jaune Quick-to-See Smith, a citizen of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Nation, has charted an exceptional and unorthodox career as an artist, activist, curator, educator, and advocate. The exhibition highlights how Smith uses her drawings, prints, paintings, and sculptures to flip commonly held historical narratives and illuminate absurdities in the dominant culture.

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