The Whitney Biennial 2024: Even Better Than the Real Thing Set to Open March 20th

 

 

 

Whitney Biennial 2024: Even Better Than the Real Thing

The Whitney Museum of American Art announces that 69 artists and 2 collectives will participate in Whitney Biennial 2024: Even Better Than the Real Thing. Opening March 20, this is the 81st edition of the Museum’s landmark exhibition series, the longest-running survey of American art. A presentation of the most relevant art and ideas of our time, the artists featured in the Whitney Biennial showcase work across most of the Museum’s gallery space as well as through a robust series of film and performance programs available at the Museum and online. Co-organized by two Whitney curators, Chrissie Iles and Meg Onli, the Biennial presents the work of contemporary artists working across media and disciplines, representing evolving notions of American art.

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‘Michelangelo Lovelace: Cleveland by Night’ at Fort Gansevoort

 

 

 

Michelangelo Lovelace, Starry Night Over The City, 2019, Acrylic on canvas, 53 x 50.25 inches. © Michelangelo Loveland Estate. Courtesy of the artist’s estate and Fort Gansevoort, New York.

Beginning February 1, 2024, Fort Gansevoort will present Cleveland by Night, its second exhibition devoted to the work of late artist Michelangelo Lovelace (1960-2021). On view will be paintings and drawings depicting nocturnal city life in Cleveland, Ohio—exterior and interior tableaux capturing the city where he was born and lived for all of his sixty years.

  • Thursday, March 7th at 6:30pm, Michelangelo Lovelace’s widow, Shirley Lovelace ~ in conversation with artist John Ahearn. Space is limited, and RSVP will be required.

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‘Natalie Ball: bilwi naats Ga’niipci’ On View at Whitney Museum of American Art

 

 

 

Image credit: Natalie Ball, Burden Basket, 2023. Elk rawhide, cotton, newspaper, wood, leather, plastic beads, willow branches, artificial hair, aluminum foil, chalk, metal clamps, rope, makeup, and graphite, 80 × 60 × 24in. (203.2 × 152.4 × 61 cm). Collection of the artist. Photo by Audrey Wang

Natalie Ball: bilwi naats Ga’niipciopening at the Whitney Museum of American Art today, November 17, 2023, is the first New York solo exhibition for boundary-breaking artist and community leader Natalie Ball.

The exhibition presents a group of never-before-seen sculptural assemblages that deepen and destabilize understandings of Indigenous life in the United States. Ball, who is Black, Modoc, and Klamath, lives and works in her ancestral homelands in Southern Oregon and Northern California, where, in addition to creating artworks, she serves as an elected official on the Klamath Tribes Tribal Council.

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Whitney Museum Presents a Three-Day Festival Celebrating Artist Harry Smith, December 8-10

 

 

 

Photographer unknown, Harry Smith at Naropa Institute, Boulder, CO, 1990. Gelatin silver print, 10 × 8 in. (25.4 × 20.3 cm). Harry Smith Papers, Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles; gift of the Harry Smith Archives. Image courtesy Whitney Museum of American Art.

The Whitney Museum of American Art invites visitors of all ages to discover and celebrate artist Harry Smith’s eclectic life and creative pursuits in a three-day festival on Friday, December 8, through Sunday, December 10. My Harry features talks, screenings, artmaking workshops, performances, and listening sessions that explore Smith’s interests in the spiritual and occult, eccentric collections, folk music, and more.

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Melvin Smith & Rose Smith: Recollections of Rondo to Open at Fort Gansevoort in November

 

 

 

Rose Smith, Journey to Minnesota,, 2008; Oil on canvas, 48 x 96 inches. © Rose Smith. courtesy of the artist and Fort Gansevoort, New York

Beginning November 16, 2023, Fort Gansevoort will present Recollections of Rondo, its first exhibition with the visionary Minnesota-based artist couple Melvin Smith and Rose Smith. This presentation features a selection of key works from the vast, ongoing, collaborative project the Smiths refer to as Rondo, which consists of painted portraits made by Rose, and collages of urban scenes along with architectural sculptures made by Melvin. Initiated in the 1990s, Rondo documents the artists’ memories of civic life in their vibrant Rondo neighborhood of St. Paul, Minnesota as it existed prior to being bulldozed in the 1960s for construction of the Interstate 94 highway. Now both in their 80s, Rose and Melvin have focused for three decades on a unique shared artistic mission to recall that lost enclave, which was the center of Black life in St. Paul and home to a number of individuals, among them Major League baseball great Dave Winfield and artist Gordon Parks, who would achieve national and international renown in their fields. Rose spent most of her youth in Rondo, while Melvin was a resident between 1963 and 1968—the neighborhood’s final years. With the construction of Interstate 94 between 1956 and 1968, the Smiths witnessed first-hand the systematic leveling of their community and its culture—the process of so-called “urban renewal” that James Baldwin dubbed “Negro Removal.”

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‘Ruth Asawa Through Line’ at The Whitney Museum of American Art

 

 

 

Ruth Asawa, Untitled (BMC.59, Meander – Straight Lines), c. 1948. Ink on paper, 7 7/8 × 13 1/2 in. (20 × 34.3 cm). Private collection. Artwork © 2023 Ruth Asawa Lanier, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Courtesy David Zwirner

Ruth Asawa Through Line, opening at the Whitney Museum of American Art on September 16, 2023, spotlights the work of groundbreaking artist Ruth Asawa (1926–2013). Known broadly for her rhythmic looped-wire sculptures, Asawa dedicated herself to daily drawing exercises, which served as the connective tissue―or through line―of her creative process and fueled her commitment to art. Through drawing, Asawa explored her surroundings and turned everyday encounters into moments of profound beauty, endowing ordinary objects with new aesthetic possibilities.

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‘Ilana Savdie: Radical Contractions’ to Open at Whitney Museum of American Art, July 14th

 

 

 

Image credit: Ilana Savdie, Baths of Synovia (Baño Sinovial), 2023. Oil, acrylic, and beeswax on canvas stretched on panel, 120 × 86 in. (304.8 × 218.44 cm). Courtesy of the Artist. © Ilana Savdie. Photograph by Lance Brewer

Ilana Savdie: Radical Contractions, opening at the Whitney Museum of American Art July 14, 2023, spotlights emerging powerhouse Ilana Savdie and her explorations of performance, transgression, identity, and power through vibrant and intense large-scale canvases. The artist’s striking new paintings and black-and-white drawings, which are foundational for her paintings, will debut at the Whitney and were created specifically for this exhibition.

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Whitney Museum Reimagines Collection in New Exhibition Exploring ~ Inheritance

 

 

 

Sophie Rivera, I am U, 1995. Gelatin silver print, 38 5/8 × 38 9/16 in. (98.1 × 97.9 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; gift of the artist 2019.390. © Estate of Dr. Martin Hurwitz

Beginning Wednesday, June 28, the Whitney Museum of American Art presents Inheritance, an exhibition of nearly sixty artworks by forty-three leading artists that traces the profound impact of legacy across familial, historical, and aesthetic lines. Featuring primarily new acquisitions and rarely-seen works from the collection, this diverse array of paintings, sculptures, videos, photographs, drawings, and major time-based media installations from the last five decades asks us to consider what has been passed on and how it may shift, change, or live again.

Inheritance is organized by Rujeko Hockley, Arnhold Associate Curator at the Whitney Museum of American Art, and is on view in the Museum’s sixth-floor galleries from June 28, 2023, through February 2024.

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High Line Presents Proposals for 2026 + 2027 Plinth & They Want to Know What You Think

 

 

 

Sammy Bali, Listen Closely: You’ll Hear Their Feet Beating Out And Beating Out – one of the proposals for High Line Plinth 2026 & 2027

Now that Pamela Rosenkranz ‘Old Tree is firmly planted on the High Line Plinth for the season, The High Line is gearing-up with proposals for 2026 and 2027. So ~ toot your horn and help The High Line select its shortlist.

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‘Yvonne Wells: Play the Hand That’s Dealt You’ to Open at Fort Gansevoort

 

 

 

Yvonne Wells, Play the Hand That’s Dealt You, 2011; Assorted fabrics, 81.5 x 65 inches © Yvonne Wells. Courtesy of the artist and Fort Gansevort, New York

Beginning June 8, 2023, Fort Gansevoort will present Play The Hand That’s Dealt You, the first New York solo exhibition of Alabama-based artist Yvonne Wells. Born in 1939 in Tuscaloosa, Wells is known for her intricate narrative quilts depicting American history subjects, pop culture figures, and religious subject matter. As a self- taught artist living and working in the same region as the enslaved female quilters from the rural Alabama community known as Gee’s Bend, Wells is aware of heritage techniques, yet cleaves to her own contemporary visual vernacular. Through a practice that illuminates quilt making as a form of fine art and not simply craft, she has developed a style that uniquely melds geometric abstraction with bold figuration. The evolution of Wells’ personal aesthetic and technical mastery will be seen through over a dozen large works on view, spanning three decades of the artist’s career.

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‘Jaune Quick-to-See Smith: Memory Map’ will Open at The Whitney Museum of American Art in April

 

 

 

Image credit: Jaune Quick-to-See Smith, Indian Map, 1992. Oil, paper, newspaper, and fabric on canvas, two panels: 60 × 100 in. (152.4 × 254 cm) overall. Private collection. © Jaune Quick-to-See Smith. Photograph by David Bowers

Jaune Quick-to-See Smith: Memory Map,on view at the Whitney Museum of American Art from April 19 through August 13, 2023, is a recognition of a groundbreaking artist’s work. For nearly five decades, Jaune Quick-to-See Smith, a citizen of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Nation, has charted an exceptional and unorthodox career as an artist, activist, curator, educator, and advocate. The exhibition highlights how Smith uses her drawings, prints, paintings, and sculptures to flip commonly held historical narratives and illuminate absurdities in the dominant culture.

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‘Zoya Cherkassky: The Arrival of Foreign Professionals’ at Fort Gansevoort

 

 

 

Zoya Cherkassky ‘Simone, 2022’; Acrylic on paper. 51.25 x 78 in. © Zoya Cherkassky. Courtesy of the artist and Fort Gansevoort

Beginning April 6, 2023, Fort Gansevoort will present The Arrival of Foreign Professionals, a solo exhibition of new paintings by Ukraine-born, Israel-based artist Zoya Cherkassky. In her latest works, Cherkassky offers up vibrant figurative compositions to depict scenes of African diasporic communities in Europe, Israel, and the USSR from the 1930s to the present day. Based upon historical research and the artist’s own memories, these paintings examine cross cultural encounters from disparate times and locations. Cherkassky’s personal experiences as the wife of a Nigerian emigrant and mother of a mixed-race child simultaneously inform her perspective and complicate her relationship to the subjects she portrays. Aware of the challenges that come with presenting these works in America—a nation whose own history of African enslavement and white supremacy remains entrenched— Cherkassky aims to engage viewers in open conversation about the aftermath of failed colonial projects.

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The Danzling, Hand-Beaded & Sequin-Embroidered Textile Work of Haitian Artist Myrlande Constant in the Exhibition ‘DRAPO’ at Fort Gansevoort in January, 2023

 

 

 

Myrlande Constant, Apres Gran Met La Fey Nan Bwa Se Tretmant Yo Viy, 2022,
Beads, sequins and tassels on fabric, 80 x 111.5 inches. ©Myrlande Constant. Courtesy of the artist and Fort Gansevoort.

Beginning January 12, 2023, Fort Gansevoort will present DRAPO, its first solo exhibition with Haitian artist Myrlande Constant, who has attracted international attention for dazzling hand-beaded and sequin-embroidered textile works in which heritage techniques are used to mingle contemporary and traditional themes. The evolution of Constant’s personal aesthetic and mastery of her medium will be evident in monumental new pieces juxtaposed with examples from earlier in the artist’s career. The exhibition has been extended through March 25, 2023.

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Snowpeople & Holliday Lights Make a Festive Return to The Meatpacking District

 

 

 

2021 Holiday Display,, Meatpacking District. Photo: Jim Fryer / BrakeThrough Media | brakethroughmedia.com

The Meatpacking Business Improvement District announced that its iconic holiday light display will return to the neighborhood with even more engaging elements. Back by popular demand, the District’s festive installation of lights, seasonal planters, iconic Snowpeople, the illuminated colonnade and more that are ripe for photo-ops will descend on the neighborhood’s streets starting Thursday, December 8 through mid-January 2023.

Below are a few images from the 2021 Holiday installation.

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The Exhibition ‘no existe un mundo poshuracán: Puerto Rican Art in the Wake of Hurricane Maria’ to Open at The Whitney, Coinciding with Fifth Anniversary of Hurricane Maria

 

 

 

Gamaliel Rodríguez, Collapsed Soul, 2020–21. Ink and acrylic on canvas, 84 × 112 in. (213.3 × 284.5 cm). © 2021 Gamaliel Rodríguez. Courtesy the artist and Nathalie Karg Gallery NYC. Photograph by Gamaliel Rodríguez

no existe un mundo poshuracán: Puerto Rican Art in the Wake of Hurricane Maria is organized to coincide with the fifth anniversary of Hurricane Maria—a category 5 storm that hit Puerto Rico on September 20, 2017. The exhibition explores how artists have responded to the transformative years since that event by bringing together more than fifty artworks made over the last five years by an intergenerational group of more than fifteen artists from Puerto Rico and the diaspora. no existe un mundo poshuracán—a verse borrowed from Puerto Rican poet Raquel Salas Rivera—is the first scholarly exhibition focused on Puerto Rican art to be organized by a large U.S. museum in nearly half a century.

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Edward Hopper’s New York Opens at Whitney Museum of American Art with Digital Interactive Map of Sites He Painted as They Look Today

 

 

 

Fig. 21. Nighthawks, 1942. Oil on canvas, 33⁄) $ 60 in. (84.1 $ 152.4 cm). Art Institute of Chicago, IL; Friends of American Art Collection

Edward Hopper’s New York, on view at the Whitney Museum of American Art from October 19, 2022, through March 5, 2023, offers an unprecedented examination of Hopper’s life and work in the city that he called home for nearly six decades (1908–67). The exhibition charts the artist’s enduring fascination with the city through more than 200 paintings, watercolors, prints, and drawings from the Whitney’s preeminent collection of Hopper’s work, loans from public and private collections, and archival materials including printed ephemera, correspondence, photographs, and notebooks. From early sketches to paintings from his late in his career, Edward Hopper’s New York reveals a vision of the metropolis that is as much a manifestation of Hopper himself as it is a record of a changing city, whose perpetual and sometimes tense reinvention feels particularly relevant today.

In addition, explore the new interactive digital map inside Edward Hopper’s New York. See the sites he painted as they look today.

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‘Dawn Williams Boyd: The Tip of the Iceberg’ to Open at Fort Gansevoort Gallery in September

 

 

 

Dawn Williams Boyd, Leaving Alabama, 2022, Assorted fabrics, cotton embroidery floss, and mixed media, 60 × 60 inches

Fort Gansevoort will present The Tip of the Iceberg, its first solo exhibition with Dawn Williams Boyd at the gallery’s space in New York City. Featuring twelve new large-scale works, this presentation coincides with the last leg of the artist’s traveling museum exhibition Dawn Williams Boyd: Woe, on view at Sarah Lawrence College in Bronxville, New York.

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‘Iwantja Rock n Roll’ to Open at Fort Gansevoort in Historic Meatpacking District

 

 

 

Kaylene Whiskey. Kungkas in Hollywood, 2021. Acrylic on linen. 65.75 x 78 inches. © Kaylene Whiskey/ Courtesy the artist and Fort Gansevoort

Fort Gansevoort is pleased to announce Iwantja Rock n Roll, a group exhibition of new works by Australian artists Vincent Namatjira, Kaylene Whiskey, and Tiger Yaltangki, three leading members of the indigenous Indulkana Community in the northwestern region of South Australia on Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara (APY) Lands. On view from Thursday, July 7, 2022, their combined paintings, complemented by recent video works by Whiskey and Yaltangki, offer insight into the confluent global influences – from contemporary Western pop culture to traditional Anangu culture – that vivify the extraordinary artistic outpouring from Iwantja Arts, one of eleven indigenous owned and governed Aboriginal art centers in the APY Art Centre Collective. Iwantja Arts supports the artistic practices of more than forty members, working across various mediums, including painting, sculpture, video art, and printmaking.

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Artist Enrique Cabrera unveils El Toro de Oro in NYC’s Meatpacking District

 

 

 

El Toro de Oro by Enrique Cabrera, at Gansevoort Meatpacking NYC. Photographer Credit: Alejandro Jimenez

Installed on May 5th (Cinco de Mayo), El Toro de Oro adds to May’s plethora of art exhibition during Art Week, with the opening of the Whitney Biennial, TEFAF and NYCxDesign, followed by VOLTA, FRIEZE, and The Photography Show.

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Whitney Biennial 2022: Quiet As It’s Kept ~ 63 Artists & Collectives Selected for the Eightieth Edition at The Whitney

 

 

 

Ralph Lemon, Untitled, 2021. Oil and acrylic on paper, 26 × 40 in. (66.1 × 101.6 cm). Image courtesy the artist

The Whitney Museum of American Art announced today that sixty-three artists and collectives will be participating in Whitney Biennial 2022: Quiet as It’s Kept, co-organized by two Whitney curators, David Breslin and Adrienne Edwards. This will be the eightieth iteration in the long-running series of annual and biennial exhibitions launched by the Museum’s founder, Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney, in 1932. The 2022 Biennial takes over most of the Whitney from April 6 through September 5, with portions of the exhibition and some programs continuing through October 23, 2022.

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Fernando Botero Celebrates his 90th Birthday with The Spinx on 14th Street + a Gallery Exhibition at David Benrimon Fine Art

 

 

 

Fernando Botero’s eight-foot-tall Spinx sculpture is on view at the 14th Street Square at 9th Avenue from March 10th through April 19, 2022.

The monument, presented by David Benrimon Fine Art, is in celebration of the artist’s 90th birthday, and coincides with the gallery’s Botero exhibition.

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Willie Birch, Chronicling Our Lives: 1987-2021 to Open at Fort Gansevoort New York

 

 

 

Willie Birch ~ Johnny Makes the Nightly News, 1988. Pencil graphite and gouache on paper with acrylic painted papier-mâché frame. 32.5 x 46.5 x 1.75 in. WB049

Fort Gansevoort Gallery will open its doors to Chronicling Our Lives: 1987-2021, a solo exhibition of works by Louisiana-based artist Willie Birch. Opening Thursday, March 3, 2022, the presentation features large paintings on paper and painted papier-mâché sculptures created between 1987 and 1996, complemented by a new monumental, mural-like work executed in black and white. Together, the thirty works on view reflect Birch’s perspective on the beauty and complexities of the human experience.

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Curated by Stickymonger: Spray Painterly at Allouche Gallery

 

 

Artist, UFO907. Image courtesy of the gallery.

Allouche Gallery will open its doors to Spray Painterly, a group show curated by Stickymonger, featuring works by Gucci Ghost, Michael Reeder, Paul Insect and UFO907. The exhibition debuts on October 21st and continues until November 16th, 2021.

Spray Painterly aims to advance the notion of spray paint as a fine art medium. While some categorize spray paint with graffiti and vandalism, curator and artist Stickymonger challenges this perception and believes that spray paint is indeed a gallery medium. The featured artists are from diverse artistic backgrounds, all of whom utilize spray paint conventionally and unconventionally to express their character-based styles.

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Jasper Johns: Mind/Mirror opens at The Whitney Museum of American Art

 

 

 

Image credit: Jasper Johns, Racing Thoughts, 1983. Encaustic and collage on canvas, 48 1/8 × 75 3/8 in. (122.2 × 191.5 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase, with funds from the Burroughs Wellcome Purchase Fund; Leo Castelli; the Wilfred P. and Rose J. Cohen Purchase Fund; the Julia B. Engel Purchase Fund; the Equitable Life Assurance Society of the United States Purchase Fund; The Sondra and Charles Gilman, Jr. Foundation, Inc.; S. Sidney Kahn; The Lauder Foundation, Leonard and Evelyn Lauder Fund; the Sara Roby Foundation; and the Painting and Sculpture Committee 84.6. © 2021 Jasper Johns / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

The radical, inventive art of Jasper Johns (b. 1930) continues to influence today’s artists like few others. In an unprecedented collaboration, the Whitney and the Philadelphia Museum of Art will stage a simultaneous retrospective—the largest of Johns’s seven-decade career—that offers a fresh take on the living legend. From his iconic flags to lesser-known and recent works, the exhibition will feature paintings, sculptures, drawings, and prints—nearly five hundred artworks across the two museums, many of which are from Johns’s personal collection and will be shown publicly for the first time.

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Winfred Rembert: 1945-2021 at Fort Gansevoort in October, 2021

 

 

 

Winfred Rembert, All Me, 2002; Dye on carved and tooled leather; 25 x 25 inches.; © 2021 Winfred Rembert / ARS NY; Courtesy Estate of Winfred Rembert and Fort Gansevoort

Fort Gansevoort will open its doors to Winfred Rembert: 1945-2021, a solo exhibition of works by Winfred Rembert, opening Thursday, October 7th (6-8 PM) at the gallery’s New York City space in the historic Meatpacking District.

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Ron English: Brand Royalty Opening at Allouche Gallery in September 2021

 

 

 

Ron English: Aqua Apes, 2021; Oil on Canvas; 36 x 54 inches. Image courtesy of the Gallery.

Allouche Gallery will open its doors to Brand Royalty, the first solo show of the Fall season, featuring the inaugural debut of twenty new paintings by the contemporary Pop and street artist. Ron English. The exhibition will remain on view at Allouche Gallery from September 18 to October 19, 2021.

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L.E.A.F. Festival of Flowers 2021 Coming to the Meatpacking District this Weekend!

 

 

Flower Flash ‘The Crosby Cat’, Lewis Miller ‘Flower Flashes’ Fernando Botero’s The Crosby Cat’, Crosby Street Hotel, 2019

Last year, L.E.A.F. celebrated #NYFlowerWeek with a celebration of its own ~ L.E.A.F. 2020 Festival of Flowers, They’re back! This weekend, June 12 ~ 13, New Yorkers can shop L.E.A.F.’s European-style flower market and visit a series of floral displays, all in the historic Meatpacking District at L.E.A.F. Festival of Flowers 2021.

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Allouche Gallery Presents ‘Operation Varsity Blues’

 

 

 

B. Robert Moore: Degrees of Separation: Admissions of Education; 60W x 40H ; Arches paper, Acrylic, charcoal, soft pastel, oil pigment stick, c. 2021; $26,000. Image courtesy of the gallery.

Allouche Gallery opens its doors to “Operation Varsity Blues,” a group exhibition exploring the structural inequities of the American higher education system through the lens of the recent high-profile college admissions scandal. The exhibition features new, commissioned works by seven artists—Lindsay AdamsDebra CartwrightKevin Claiborne, Malaika Temba, Lindsey Brittain CollinsAlteronce GumbyLanise HowardJeffrey MerisRaushan RuckerKhari TurnerTelvin Wallace, and Esteban Whiteside—who are responding to the 2019 college admissions scandal of the same name wherein affluent families conspired to influence undergraduate admissions decisions at several top-tier American colleges and universities. “Operation Varsity Blues” is organized by author, art historian, and independent curator Charles Moore.

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‘The Intricate Intimate’ opens at Allouche Gallery

 

 

 

Artist, Monica Canilao. Image courtesy of the gallery

In collaboration, artists and curators SwoonMonica Canilao, and BLK PALATE present a group art exhibition focusing on the erotic. Featuring established and emerging artists, The Intricate Intimate offers a safer space for artists to explore the intricacies of erotic intimacy, on their own terms and based on their own definitions.

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May we Know our Own Strength ~ Release your Burden in a New Installation by Amanda Phingbodhipakkiya

 

 

 

May We Know our Own Strength, Amanda Phingbodhipakkiya

MAY WE KNOW OUR OWN STRENGTH was created by Amanda Phingbodhipakkiya, who brought us public art addressing anti-Asian racism, working in partnership with the NYC Commission on Human Rights and NYC Department of Cultural Affairs.

Here, she created a place for New Yorkers to gather and share their hidden sins, secrets, and suffering. This is a space for vulnerability and healing.

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David Hammons Permanent Installation ‘Day’s End’ in Hudson River Park + Six Rarely-Seen Works in Exhibit at The Drawing Center

 

 

 

Rendering of the proposed project, Day’s End by David Hammons, as seen from the Whitney Museum of American Art. Courtesy Guy Nordenson and Associates.

On April 29, 2021, the Whitney announced the completion of David Hammons’s permanent public sculpture Day’s End (2021), one of the largest public art projects completed in the United States this year. Located in Hudson River Park along the southern edge of Gansevoort Peninsula, directly across from the Museum, Day’s End was developed in collaboration with the artist and Hudson River Park Trust. The sculpture derives its inspiration and name from multi-media artist Gordon Matta-Clark’s 1975 intervention in which he cut openings into the existing, abandoned Pier 52 shed. With exquisite simplicity, Hammons’s artwork traces the outlines, dimensions, and location of the original Pier 52 shed in slender steel pipes. Visible from numerous vantage points at the Museum and from multiple locations along the Hudson River Park promenade, the sculpture measures 52 feet high at its peak, 325 feet long, and 65 feet wide.

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Randolph Lamonier: My Kind of Dirty, an Online Exhibition in conversation with Maxwell Alexandre + Raphael Fonseca at Fort Gansevoort Gallery on View in April

 

 

 

Randolpho Lamonier, Rua Vista Alegre (Vista Alegre Street), 2021 Mixed media (fabric, embroidery and buttons on carpet) 17.5 x 24 in., RL005

Beginning Thursday, April 1st, Fort Gansevoort will present My Kind Of Dirty, the gallery’s first exhibition with Brazilian artist Randolpho Lamonier. This online presentation brings together recent textile works in which Lamonier responds to his upbringing in Contagem, an industrial city in southeastern Brazil, drawing upon observations of hardship and inequality to create powerful expressions in vivid colors, word combinations, and raw images. The artist locates his inspiration in an environment where joy grows proportionally to misfortune and likens his work to diaristic entries. Rendered in deceptively humble handwork and fabrics, the scintillating psychedelic landscapes on view in My Kind Of Dirty celebrate “the exuberance of life that resists against the necropolitical agenda guided by the current Brazilian government,” the artist has said. In this way, Lamonier’s approach to representation acts as personal revolution, whereby the aura of possibility defines his blueprint for the future. My Kind Of Dirty is accompanied by the transcript of a conversation between Lamonier and fellow Brazilian artist Maxwell Alexandre with curator Raphael Fonseca.

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‘Stickymonger: Still Smiling’ at Allouche Gallery NYC

 

 

 

Stickymonger, Waiting 1980, 2021, Aerosol paint, 106×79 in.

Feelings of loneliness, fear and the unknown have engrossed the globe since the outbreak of COVID-19 back in March 2020. The pandemic can take its toll, pushing people further from others and leaving many feeling like they are living in a surreal world. Stickymonger conveys these difficult emotions across her latest body of work, but also incorporates the unpredictable, magical moments of everyday life to instill hope and positivity amid the difficult circumstances posed by the pandemic. These otherworldly pieces will fill New York City’s Allouche Gallery as part of a solo exhibition entitled “Still Smiling.”……Keith Estiler

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Julie Mehretu: A Mid Career Survey at The Whitney in March, 2021

 

 

 

Julie Mehretu, Retopistics: A Renegade Excavation, 2001. Ink and acrylic on canvas, 101 ½ × 208 ½ inches (257.81 × 529.59 cm). Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, Bentonville, Arkansas 2013.28.  © Julie Mehretu

Co-organized by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and the Whitney Museum of American Art, Julie Mehretu is a midcareer survey that will unite more than seventy paintings and works on paper dating from 1996 to the present, reflecting the breadth of Mehretu’s multilayered practice. Born in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, in 1970 and based in New York City, Mehretu has created new forms and found unexpected resonances by drawing on the histories of art and human civilization. Her play with scale and technique, as evident in intimate drawings, large canvases, and complex forms of printmaking, will be explored in depth.

Julie Mehretu at The Whitney. Image taken from Zoom press preview courtesy of The Whitney

Filling the Whitney’s entire fifth floor gallery, the exhibition will take advantage of the expansive and open space to create dramatic vistas of Mehretu’s often panoramic paintings. The first-ever comprehensive survey of Mehretu’s career, Julie Mehretu is organized by Christine Y. Kim, curator of contemporary art at LACMA, with Rujeko Hockley, assistant curator at the Whitney. The installation at the Whitney is overseen by Hockley and on view from March 25 through August 8, 2021.

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Sacred Nation, Scared Nation ~ a Virtual Exhibition to Open at Fort Gansevoort

 

 

 

Above Image: Gordon Hookey, Ready to Rumble, 2020, Oil pastel and pencil on paper, 30.5 x 44 inches.

Beginning January 7, Fort Gansevoort will present Sacred Nation, Scared Nation, the gallery’s first exhibition with the noted Waanyi Aboriginal artist Gordon Hookey. Organized in collaboration with Los Angeles-based artist Gary Simmons, the presentation will focus on Hookey’s use of metaphors, wordplay, and humor – sometimes brazenly provocative – to subvert tropes of Western colonialization and to reclaim, empower, and redefine Aboriginal culture. Eschewing the traditional dot abstraction most commonly associated with indigenous Australian art, he deploys deceptively folksy figuration, contemporary images, and bold painted words in paintings that connect Black Aboriginal experience to that of African Americans.

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The Whitney presents First Solo Museum Exhibition, Salman Toor: How Will I Know

 

 

 

Image credit: Salman Toor, Four Friends, 2019. Oil on plywood, 40 × 40 in. (101.6 × 101.6 cm). Collection of Christie Zhou. © Salman Toor. Image courtesy the artist and Luhring Augustine, New York

Salman Toor’s first solo museum exhibition—originally scheduled to open in March 2020 but postponed due to the pandemic—will be presented by the Whitney Museum of American Art from November 13, 2020 to April 4, 2021. Primarily making intimate oil-on-panel works, Toor expands the tradition of figurative painting by melding sketch-like immediacy with disarming detail to create affecting views of young, queer Brown men living in New York City and South Asia. Salman Toor: How Will I Know is part of the Whitney’s emerging artists program, which most recently included solo shows by Kevin Beasley and Eckhaus Latta, and will be on view in the first-floor John R. Eckel, Jr. Foundation Gallery, which is accessible to the public free-of-charge.

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Working Together: The Photographers of The Kamoinge Workshop to Open at The Whitney

 

 

 

Ming Smith, America seen through Stars and Stripes, New York City, New York, printed ca. 1976. Gelatin silver print, sheet: 15 3/4 × 20 in. (40.01 × 50.8 cm), image: 12 1/2 × 18 1/2 in. (31.75 × 46.99 cm). Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Adolph D. and Wilkins C. Williams Fund, 2016.241. © Ming Smith

The much anticipated exhibition, Working Together: The Photographers of the Kamoinge Workshop will finally unveil at The Whitney on November 21st. This groundbreaking exhibition features over 150 photographs by fourteen early members of the Kamoinge Workshop, nine of whom are living and working today.

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Fort Gansevoort Gallery debuts ‘Seeing Through You’, a Series of Weekly Online Exhibitions

 

 

Pilar Trujillo, Desayuno sobre la hierba, 2015. Tapestry (burlap embroidery with wool), 73 x 61 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Fort Gansevoort

Fort Gansevoort Gallery will open its online window, announcing SEEING THROUGH YOU, a series of weekly online exhibitions organized for the gallery by invited curators and scholars. Launching with its first exhibition on Thursday, March 26, 2020, this initiative will highlight artists from around the globe and aim to initiate lively discourse among larger and more diverse audiences for whom the web and social media are an even more vital ‘salon space’ in a time of crisis.

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Gordon Hookey: Sacred Nation, Scared Nation at Fort Gansevoort

 

 

 

Gordon Hookey, GH001, Pelvis Deadly, 2005, Oil on canvas, 48 x 66.25 inches

Fort Gansevoort Gallery will open its doors to Sacred Nation, Scared Nation, the first solo exhibition in the United States for noted Brisbane-based Waanyi Aboriginal artist Gordon Hookey (b. 1961, Cloncurry, Australia). Hookey uses metaphors, wordplay, and humor – sometimes brazenly provocative – to subvert tropes of English colonialization and to reclaim, empower, and redefine Aboriginal culture. Eschewing the traditional dot abstraction most commonly associated with indigenous Australian art, Hookey deploys deceptively folksy figuration and bold painted words in paintings that connect Black Aboriginal experience to that of African Americans.

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‘Doze Green: A Volta’ to Open at Allouche Gallery

 

 

 

Artist, Doze Green: Ramma 2019: Acrylic on canvas: 53.5 x 66.5 in. Image courtesy Allouche Gallery

Allouche Gallery will open its doors to new works by legendary New York artist Doze GreenA Volta, opening on Thursday November 14th, marks the return to the city that inspired and defined Green’s long standing career. Concurrently, this show offers a comprehensive look into the evolution of the artist’s style leading up to his present creative departure, which is deeply influenced by the raw nature of Alto Paraíso de Goiás, Brazil, where Doze Green lives now.

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Vanessa German: Trampoline at Fort Gansevoort

 

 

 

Vanessa German, Venus as an Around Away Girl, 2019, Mixed-media collage on New York Times magazine, 25 x 19.5 x 5 inches

Fort Gansevoort, in association with Pavel Zoubok Fine Art, is pleased to present Vanessa German, TRAMPOLINE: Resilience & Black Body & Soul, opening Thursday, November 7th, 2019. German’s exhibition will showcase her richly encrusted sculptures, which she refers to as power-figures, alongside a series of wall-mounted altars that each act as seers or protectors carrying with them the gift of their own human technology: joy, love, and protection for the souls of Black Americans. The work is made as an act of love in response to the daily injustices and violence committed against Black and Brown people, their bodies and their souls. Each figure confronts us with the questions, “how do we survive? How do we, as hybrid-people, keep breathing? How then do we surpass mere existence into creative champions, future makers, lovers even?”

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BÄST: Melmoth Confetti at Allouche Gallery

 

 

 

Bäst: Untitled, 2019 Acrylic on canvas 101 x 135 inches

Allouche Gallery opened its doors to the solo exhibition, BÄST: Melmoth Confetti, a new body of work influenced by Oscar Wilde’s favored alias, Sebastian Melmoth. with an opening reception on October 17 from 6-9pm.

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Rafa Macarron: Fluorescent Routine to open at Allouche Gallery in September

 

 

 

Rafa Macarron, Rutina Fluor, 2019 Mixed media on canvas 90 x 115 inches

Allouche Gallery opens its doors to Rafa Macarron: Fluorescent Routine, in a solo exhibition ~ a magic circus of elongated figures on a journey to Manhattan!

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50 Years After Stonewall at Fort Gansevoort

 

 

 

Image: Paula Gately Tillman, ‘Nelson Sullivan’, 1986, Silver Print. Courtesy, Fales Library, NYU

Fort Gansevoort presents A Look Back: 50 Years After Stonewall, organized by Lucy Beni and Adam Shopkorn. The exhibition commemorates the fiftieth anniversary of the 1969 Stonewall Uprising, a six-day riot said to have been spontaneously set off byMarsha P. Johnson in protest of one of many regular police raids at The Stonewall Inn, a gay bar located in New York City’s Greenwich Village. This event marks the beginning of the Gay Liberation movement and the contemporary fight for LGBTQ+ rights in the United States.

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Nick Georgiou: Codex Chroma at Allouche Gallery

 

 

 

Nick Georgiou, Unassuming Self, 2019. Discarded books, acrylic ink and paint on canvas. 48 x 60 x 5 in. Courtesy Allouche Gallery

Allouche Gallery will open its doors to Nick Georgiou: Codex Chroma, a vibrant new collection of paper wall reliefs, exploring the unique life cycle of books as objects of art.

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Sine Qua Non by Sebastian Wahl Opens at Allouche Gallery

 

 

Sebastian Wahl, The Dream Machine, 2018. Collage and resin on MDF. 51 x 84 in. Image courtesy Allouche Gallery

Sine qua non‘ is derived from Latin and can be translated literally as “Without which, not.” It represents the idea that without (something), (something else) won’t be possible.

In Sebastian Wahl’s new body of work, he explores the contrast between colors and solid black, while incorporating his signature process of arranging images between multiple layers of clear resin to create depth and dimension, creating a sense of zero gravity where images are suspended in time and space

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‘Patrick Martinez | That Which We Do Not See’ opening at Fort Gansevoort

 

 

 

Patrick Martinez, Coretta, 2019, Neon, Edition of 3, 1 AP, 24 x 30 x 3 inches

Fort Gansevoort will open its doors to the exhibition PATRICK MARTINEZ | That Which We Do Not See, the first solo show featuring new work by Los Angeles-based artist Patrick Martinez.

“Everything that we see is a shadow cast by that which we do not see.” Martin Luther King, The Measure of a Man, 1958

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Eric Freeman + Nathan Ritterpusch + Brian Willmont = ‘A 3 Person Show’ at Allouche Gallery

 

 

Eric Freeman, Untitled, 2018, oil on canvas, 48 x 48 in. Image courtesy Allouche Gallery

Allouche Gallery will open its doors to A 3 Person Show featuring the works of Eric Freeman, Nathan Rittenpusch, and Brian Willmont on January 31st, with each artist defining their art in their own precise and distinctive style.

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