Three Public Art Installations by Jim Rennert Arrive in Pershing Square, Across from Grand Central Terminal

 

 

 

Jim Rennert: Inner Dialogue. Image courtesy Cavalier Gallery

Cavalier Gallery unveiled three life-size works by artist Jim Rennert, which have been installed in New York City’s Pershing Square Plaza West located on the west side of Park Avenue between East 41st and East 42nd Streets in Midtown Manhattan. Each sculpture stands over 6 feet tall and depicts the daily struggles and achievements of everyday people.  The sculpture installations are being facilitated as part of the New York City Department of Transportation’s Temporary Art Program.

Jim Rennert: Timing. Image courtesy Cavalier Gallery

Rennert’s works represent the meeting point between the business world and the everyday lives of ordinary people, similar to the way that Pershing Square represents the joining of the business and community aspects of landmark Grand Central Terminal’s neighborhood. These three works embody three ideas key to the fast-paced life of Grand Central, for both locals and visitors:

Jim Rennert: Timing. Image courtesy Cavalier Gallery

Timing: a representation of a person looking anxiously at their watch, relates to the various aspects of business life and the daily struggle between yourself and others. From being at the right place at the right time to having the right opportunity, the importance of timing is essential.

Jim Rennert: Inner Dialogue. Image courtesy Cavalier Gallery

Inner Dialogue: the small figure that stands in the palm of the hand of a larger life-size figure is metaphorically speaking to their own conscience, showcasing the familiar feeling of having a conversation with that small voice within.

Listen: invites viewers to pause and reflect amidst the ever-changing and fast-paced world around them. Listening is an acquired skill, and if we take a moment to pause and listen to others, then the real communication can begin.

Jim Rennert: Listen. Image courtesy Cavalier Gallery

“Taken together, these three concepts encapsulate the thoughts and feelings of anyone passing through the plaza, whether they’re late for an important meeting, contemplating their next big move, or just taking a break from it all,” said Jim Rennert. “When a visitor sees these pieces, they may very well see them as a kindred spirit doing exactly what they are doing. While not everyone wears a suit, I feel the themes transcend to everyone.”

“When Pershing Square Plaza West first opened to the general public in May 2019, we hoped it would regularly attract temporary art installations from world renowned artists,” said Fred Cerullo, President and CEO of Grand Central Partnership, Inc. “So, as the Grand Central neighborhood begins to come back to life after a tough year, we are really excited that the Plaza will play host to three dynamic, larger-than-life sculptures created by Jim Rennert.”

Timing, Inner Dialogue and Listen will be located at Pershing Square Plaza West across from Grand Central Terminal beginning April 15 through December 2021.

Jim Rennert: Listen. Image courtesy Cavalier Gallery

Jim Rennert was born in 1958, and grew up in Las Vegas, Nevada, and Salt Lake City, Utah. After 10 years of working in business Jim started sculpting in 1990. He became an expert in the lost-wax casting method, a process that harkens back to Bronze Age, which produces a duplicate metal sculpture from the original sculpture. He began exhibiting in galleries in 1993 and has since gained significant recognition. He continues to exhibit at the major art fairs in Miami, Los Angeles, and New York City, and has been featured in publications such as Sculptural Review, American Art Collector, and The Inquirer and Mirror. His work is in numerous private and public collections, including the Utah Governor’s Mansion, Terra Industries, GSL Electric, The Church Museum of History and Art, and the Granite Education Foundation.

Rennert comes from a business background, having made the decision to pursue his career in sculpture over 20 years ago. His works deal with the physical or psychological challenges of the competitive corporate world, often incorporating figures dressed in business attire and symbolic objects such as briefcases and ladders. The titles work with the pieces to solidify the concepts, and sometimes they reflect on the daily struggles and achievements with a sense of humor and irony. His work has become more serious lately, exploring more on our thoughts and beliefs as a society. Businessman or not, everyone can still relate to the themes in their own personal ways.

Want to see more? Step over to 1700 Broadway (on view through 2022) and at Dag Hammarskjöld Plaza through August 2021.

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